Facts and Figures

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4.3 million people die from indoor air pollution-caused illness each year. Nearly all of these deaths occur in low and lower-middle income countries.

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45% of China’s 1,350,000,000 population uses solid fuels for cooking.

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63% of India’s population, 780 million people, still uses solid fuels for cooking. Close to 1/7 of them will die because of it. They use woodfuel more than any other country.

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About 396,000 people die every year as a result of air pollution in Africa, mainly as a result of using biomass for cooking and heating.

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Around 70 percent of burn injuries we treat around the world are caused by open fires or stoves used for cooking.

LPG Facts

Because it is non-toxic, if a leak were to occur, LPG would not contaminate the soil or aquifers in the affected area.

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Both women and men exposed to heavy indoor smoke are 2-3 times more likely to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

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Cooking on traditional cookstoves is a far greater risk factor than poor water and sanitation, lead or radon pollution, or smog (ozone) and outdoor soot.

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Emerging evidence suggests that it also increases the risk of asthma, tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease, and low birth weight.

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Gathering solid fuels like wood can lead to deforestation and degradation or loss of tree resources.

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Health risks include respiratory infections, pulmonary disease, and lung cancer.

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Household air pollution (HAP) from smoke-inducing coal and biomass results in one death every 16 seconds, mostly women and young children.

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In environmental causes of death, indoor air pollution is second only to contaminated waterborne diseases.

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In India, 1,022,000 people die each year from Home Air Pollution. 100,000 of them are children.

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In Latin America, 166 million people cook over open fires.

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Indoor air pollution alone is the leading risk factor for burden of disease (years of life lost combined with years lived at less than full health) in South Asia.

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Indoor air pollution is the tenth leading cause of avoidable deaths worldwide.

LPG Facts

It is extremely versatile and can be used in over a thousand different applications.

LPG Facts

Large-scale adoption of LPG as an alternative to traditional solid fuels is an attainable goal, as evidenced in countries across the world. 90% of Brazil’s population uses LPG, 75% of Indonesia’s population has made the switch, and 45% of India’s population now utilizes this alternative fuel.

LPG Facts

LPG can improve air quality by removing pollutants such as sulfur oxides (Sox), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and harmful particulate matter (PM).

LPG Facts

LPG comprises butane or propane and is a co-product of oil and natural gas production. It requires no additional efforts to produce.

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More than 1 million people a year die from chronic obstructive respiratory disease (COPD) that develops due to exposure to such indoor air pollution.

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Nearly 3 billion people rely on solid fuels to cook their food.

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Nearly 50% of pneumonia deaths among children under five are due to particulate matter inhaled from indoor air pollution.

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Respiratory illness from cooking on primitive stoves will be causing 4,000 premature deaths each day by 2030 if nothing is done to address the problem.

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The low combustion efficiency of solid fuels used for cooking and heating in rural Africa and poor ventilation often result in concentrations of indoor air pollution 10-30 times over World Health Organization limits.

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The World Health Organization reported 41 million Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) were lost due to indoor air pollution.

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These avoidable health risks and deaths disproportionately affect women and children, the ones collecting solid fuel and cooking with it.

LPG Facts

This gas has lower greenhouse emissions than any other fossil fuel with 50% fewer carbon emissions than coal and 20% fewer than heating oil.